Male. 30. Certified apostate. One half of the Arts & CRASH! Team. You can see our stuff at that link, feel free to buy or commission anything you want.

Other tumblrs of mine:

Cover Mash-Ups||Fuck Yeah (Dead) X-Men || S**T: RuPaul Says || Arts & CRASH!

 

comicsalliance:

4/20 SPECIAL: A COMPLETE HISTORY OF ‘FASTLANE,’ MARVEL’S AMAZING ANTI-MARIJUANA COMIC
By Chris Sims
If you were reading Marvel Comics in 1999, you read Fastlane. For four solid months, it was absolutely unavoidable, an eight-page anti-marijuana insert that would pop up right in the middle of every single Marvel Comic to let you know about the dangers of weed, a drug that was glorified in the media and would lead users to a dangerous world of addiction and deadly hallucinations that was so over the top even the producers of Dragnetthought that maybe they should tone it down a little. And if you’re a certain kind of person who was reading Marvel Comics in the ’90s, you actually kind of love it.

I mean, I do. And that’s why, with 4/20 and all its attendant celebrations coming up this weekend, it’s time for a look back on  what might actually be the highest circulating (and most bizarre) Marvel Comic of all time with a Complete Oral History of Fastlane, from artist Gregg Schigiel, Editor Steve Behling, Head of Marvel Creative Services Mike Thomas, and Senior Vice President for Strategic Promotions and Advertising John Fraser.

READ MORE. OH SO MUCH MORE.

comicsalliance:

4/20 SPECIAL: A COMPLETE HISTORY OF ‘FASTLANE,’ MARVEL’S AMAZING ANTI-MARIJUANA COMIC

By Chris Sims

If you were reading Marvel Comics in 1999, you read Fastlane. For four solid months, it was absolutely unavoidable, an eight-page anti-marijuana insert that would pop up right in the middle of every single Marvel Comic to let you know about the dangers of weed, a drug that was glorified in the media and would lead users to a dangerous world of addiction and deadly hallucinations that was so over the top even the producers of Dragnetthought that maybe they should tone it down a little. And if you’re a certain kind of person who was reading Marvel Comics in the ’90s, you actually kind of love it.

I mean, I do. And that’s why, with 4/20 and all its attendant celebrations coming up this weekend, it’s time for a look back on  what might actually be the highest circulating (and most bizarre) Marvel Comic of all time with a Complete Oral History of Fastlanefrom artist Gregg Schigiel, Editor Steve Behling, Head of Marvel Creative Services Mike Thomas, and Senior Vice President for Strategic Promotions and Advertising John Fraser.

READ MORE. OH SO MUCH MORE.

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via blvckovt)

marvel1980s:

1983 - Uncanny X-Men #174 by Chris Claremont, Paul Smith, Bob Wiacek, and Glynis Oliver

sockich:

Why did I have to fall in love with Scott bloody Summers?

New X-Men #139 by Grant Morrison, art by Phil Jimenez

Has Emma Frost ever been written this good again?

http://fuckyeahblackwidow.tumblr.com/post/83020499455/hello-world-i-want-to-watch-a-black-widow-movie

fuckyeahblackwidow:

Hello, world— I want to watch a Black Widow movie because I am a fan of Black Widow, because superhero spy stories are my jam, because I want to see Yelena and Alexi and all of that brought to life and breathing. It is not a generic yearning for a woman-shaped hero movie. I mention gender a lot…

Preach